Hassan Rouhani

More than Diplomacy

35 years after the Islamic Revolution in Iran, diplomatic relations between the Islamic Republic and the United States is finally thawing. The United Kingdom’s former representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Peter Jenkins, argues that more has to be done to neutralize several decades of mistrust.

nader Hashemi

A Horizon of Opportunity

As talks resume this week in an effort to diffuse the crisis over Iran’s nuclear program, hopes are high that the U.S.–Iran relationship will thaw for good. Analyst Nader Hashemi argues that the pro-democracy movement in Iran will also benefit from a more amiable relationship between the United States and Iran.

Japan Disputed Islands

Seas of Tension

Many interpret China’s regional disputes as signs of a rising world power flexing its muscles. Yukon Huang, the World Bank’s former country director for China, argues that understanding each country’s point of view is key to de-escalating tensions in the region.

Mideast Egypt

Locked Out of Prosperity

The high hopes for social and political change that came over the Arab world almost three years ago have now transformed into uncertainty. World-renowned economist Hernando de Soto argues that nothing will be resolved until people are given the opportunity to prosper within the world market economy.

Hassan Rouhani

An End to Enmity?

Last month, President Barack Obama telephoned the president of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Hassan Rouhani. It was the first direct diplomatic contact between the two countries’ leaders in over 30 years. Mansour Farhang, the Islamic Republic’s first ambassador to the United Nations, argues that ending decades of hostility and distrust may be difficult, but not impossible.

wael haddara bg

Insurmountable Odds

An Egyptian court has banned the Muslim Brotherhood outright, preventing the group and its affiliates from participating in future elections. But Wael Haddara, a former senior adviser to ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, argues that despite its genuine effort to govern, the Brotherhood was up against impossible odds.

jo nye bg

By Way of Power

An increasingly chaotic Middle East and the rise of China have led some to question the United States’ primacy in global politics. International affairs theorist Joseph Nye argues that though the United States isn’t in decline, it can only maintain its influence by working more closely with other powers.